My Story:

How I learned to crush my
inner critic and how you can too.

I remember the very moment my purpose was revealed to me … a profound moment
that changed the course of my life …


Of course, just because I knew my purpose didn't mean the road was an easy one.
Why? Because I was blocking my own way, without even knowing it.

 


Can you relate?

 


While we all have dreams and goals, the truth is (ironically) we are our worst enemy.

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When I was little, I was a pretty happy kid.


I had a big toothy smile and straggly brown hair. I was full of joy and hope, with big brown eyes that were wide open with wonder and excitement for life. These were the best of times... my inner critic hadn't yet developed — you know,


Remember that version of you?

I grew up in a loving home nestled in a charming little town outside of Baltimore, until seventh grade,
when my family moved to Connecticut.
Talk about timing: I mean, really, what socially awkward,
prepubescent kid doesn’t want to move to a new town during middle school?!

I remember being the newcomer, trying to find my place among a sea of girls who were probably just as insecure and uncomfortable in their own skin as I was. But to me, they seemed like they had all the confidence in the world.
 

One of my first days of attending my new school was my birthday, and it was awful. No one knew it was my birthday, and for some reason, I was embarrassed to say anything, maybe because I was afraid no one would care. To make matters worse, I was sent home from school that day with lice!


It was horrifying.

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My sister

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From then on, I felt deeply insecure about my place with my classmates. Looking back, I now realize that it was just an internal story; nobody actually knew I had been sent home with lice.


At the time, however, this episode was just one of many that added to my feelings of not being enough: not cool enough, pretty enough, liked enough.


That same year, after making some friends, my best friend (remember your BFF?) hosted a coed party without telling me.


When I asked her why, she looked right at my stomach — sure, I was a little chunky — and said, “I didn’t think you’d feel comfortable.”


Ouch!

I began to feel worthless and spin stories about who 
I was, and from this experience, “Mitzy” was born.


“Mitzy” is what I have named my inner critic. She started as a 
whisper, but quickly became a powerful voice during my teenage 
years and beyond.

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In an attempt to prove my worth, I poured myself into academics, becoming a straight-A student from seventh grade through my Ph.D. I realize that this doesn’t seem like a bad thing (“Poor Elizabeth, got good grades!”), but the motivation behind these positive accomplishments was an attempt to feel worthy.


In fact, it developed into an unrelenting drive to be perfect, along with the sense that anything less meant I was not good enough.

Looking back (I didn't realize it then but now I do) I understand that the desire to 
make external circumstances in my life more positive was fueled by a sense 

of conditional self-worth.

Conditional self-worth sounds something like this:



IF the conditions were met (A’s on my exams, people
liking me), THEN I would feel good about myself.

Except that once I achieved an external goal, I found myself searching for the next
condition that would make me feel good. It was like running on a self-worth
treadmill where I got nowhere. All this self-imposed pressure left me feeling empty 
inside, not to mention stressed out and exhausted. Maybe you can relate?

 


The truth is, the “If / Then formula” doesn’t work.

Except that once I achieved an external goal, I found myself searching for the next
condition that would make me feel good. It was like running on a self-worth
treadmill where I got nowhere. All this self-imposed pressure left me feeling empty 
inside, not to mention stressed out and exhausted. Maybe you can relate?

 


The truth is, the “If / Then formula” doesn’t work.

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After college, I became a physical therapist and had planned on that being my long-term career because I absolutely loved it.


Until the unexpected day when I found my purpose:


I was a 24-year-old physical therapist working in a Veterans Administration hospital when a gentleman with a new amputation came to me for PT. I was excited to teach him to walk again, which was what I thought he wanted, too. Boy, was I wrong. Instead, he wanted nothing to do with me and began yelling to be returned to his room. Later, during rounds with the entire team, the doctor’s solution was to put him on an antidepressant.


Baffled, I thought to myself, “You just cut off the guy’s leg. Shouldn’t we help him process this first?”


It was so clear to me that he needed more than just pills in that moment. 

He needed emotional support.

The next thought changed the course of my life:
“I am supposed to help people like this —
people who are dealing with the challenges of
life — to not just cope but THRIVE.”


So I went back to school to study psychology. On one of my first days, I
remember taking notes during a lecture and thinking, "Why do I have to get a
Ph.D. to learn this? Everyone would benefit from knowing more about how our
mind functions, and how to make it for and not against us.”

And that has become my mission:
To share research-supported strategies to help you deal with
whatever life throws at you. How to control your inner critic,
get out of your own way, and live the life you truly desire.


Are YOU ready?


I am here to share the methods I have personally learned and developed to help you silence your inner "Mitzy" so that you can live from a place of fulfillment and joy. It’s how I’ve helped people crush their unique inner critic, taught them how to overcome their conditional self-worth, and given them tools to thrive.


Personally, I use these tools even as I navigate my own way today, because life happens to all of us. As I coach people, travel the globe speaking, write books, present on television, and host retreats, it may be easy for people to assume that my life is perfect. But I have struggles just like everyone else. Our family is coping with my husband’s declining health, which has been a challenge for several years. And yet, even during tough times, I can use these tools to find joy, meaning, and peace in each moment. And so can you!


You are not alone. You don’t need to be stuck.
Let’s take this journey together.

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BIO
Dr. Elizabeth Lombardo is the authority on how to crush your inner critic so that you can live a life of purpose, fulfillment and True Success™.
She’s America’s most trusted celebrity psychologist with over 100 national media interviews including The Today Show, Good Morning America, Dr. Oz, Fox Business News, The Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and countless others.
Considered Shaquille O’Neal’s “Head Coach for Happiness” Dr. Elizabeth Lombardo is on a mission to help you recognize your REAL self worth, so you can live the life you’ve always dreamed of.
Dr. E has personally helped celebrities and high performing executives, entrepreneurs and athletes crush their inner critic and access untapped, practically limitless, reserves of potential.
Through her inspiring writings, on-line training, passionate keynote speeches and private one-on-one work, Dr. E is on a mission to change the global conversation around ICS (Inner Critic Syndrome) FOR GOOD… so we can all live happier, fuller and more connected lives.

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Is Your "Inner Critic" Holding You Back From True Success™?

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